Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Mark Twain and Kurt Tucholsky

For all of you who live in New York, here is a special event: We will have a reading at the KGB bar for Kurt Tucholsky's Berlin! Berlin! Dispatches from the Weimar Republic, and our upcoming book, A Tramp in Berlin. New Mark Twain Stories. David Henry Sterry will read. 

The date is June 16, from 7pm to 9pm. The Mark Twain book will come out June 23, so this is a preview. The address is 85 E 4th St., New York, 10003, between Second and Bowery.

http://kgbbar.com/calendar/events/berlinica_publishing_reading/

Kurt Tucholsky was one of the most famed writers of the Weimar Republic and no stranger to bars himself: When he published his first book, Rheinsberg, an erotic picture novel for lovers, he rented a book bar at Berlin's Kurfürstendamm (together with Kurt Safranski who delivered the pictures for Rheinsberg). Everybody who bought the book got a free shot of liquor. So, we are going to reenact this at the KGB bar. There will also be a bit of Weimar 1920s music.

Mark Twain spent half a year in Berlin; we will read one of his unpublished stories. Also the Twain book will be for sale at the KBG bar, and from June 23 at Amazon and Barnes & Noble.





Here is more about both books.


A Tramp in Berlin” tells how Mark Twain spent the winter of 1891–1892 in the German capital. America’s foremost humorist conspired with diplomats, frequented the salons, had breakfast with duchesses, and dined with the emperor. He also suffered an “organized dog-choir club,” picked a fight with the police, was abused by a porter, got lost on streetcars, and witnessed a proletarian uprising. Twain’s unpublished Berlin stories are assembled here for the first time, together with a riveting account of his adventures. The book will come out June 23, this is a preview.
“Berlin! Berlin!” is a satirical selection from the man with the acid pen and the perfect pitch for hypocrisy, who was as much the voice of 1920s Berlin as Georg Grosz was its face. It shines a light on the Weimar Republic and the post-World War I struggle, which fore­shadowed the Third Reich. This book collects Kurt Tucholsky’s news articles, poems, and funny stories about his home town Berlin, never published in America before. With a foreword by New York author Anne Nelson and an introduction by Ian King, the chair of the Kurt-Tucholsky-Society.
by Eva C. Schweitzer

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